Pistachio Crusted Cod

I love seafood (although I admit I used to be very intimidated by it-which is stupid as it’s one of the easiest things to cook), I could eat it every single day and is one of the things I miss not living on a coast right now-less fresh options. I happened to be at one of our new local grocery stores recently and they had some really decent looking wild caught cod so I decided to buy some. It was in week three of my Whole 30 and I wanted to do something different with the fish instead of just putting salt/pepper and citrus on it, so I decided I’d use my Vitamix to make a “breading.” I have this brand new Vitamix and for whatever reason I haven’t used it a whole lot since I got it (shame on me!), so I winged it and threw some shelled pistachios in to pulse into “bread crumb” consistency. Super easy and it made the perfect crumbs. I then dumped them out on a plate to dredge the cod in – what resulted was probably one of the (easiest – win!) best recipes I’ve ever made, and because I ate it all before hubby came home from business travel I will absolutely be making it again and soon! I couldn’t get enough of the nutty, rich flavor combined with some truffle ghee I dropped on top at the very end of baking.

Pistachio Crusted Cod

  • Pistachio crumbs (to whatever consistency you prefer)
  • Cod filets
  • Avocado oil
  • Salt/Pepp
  • White truffle salt ghee

Drizzle avocado oil on the cod and generously sprinkle with salt and pepper. Dredge cod through the pistachio bread crumbs and bake in a glass baking dish at 400 degrees until cooked through (one end of my cod was really thick, so I used a meat thermometer to ensure it was thoroughly cooked to 145 degrees). Once the fish was cooked I turned the oven off and dropped about 4 TBSP of white truffle salt ghee (brand is 4th and Heart, and it’s my favorite thing ever) on top of the cod and let that melt into the fish. What resulted was the tastiest, flaky, rich, nutty dinner, and it reheated very well.

Crockpot Carnitas

Sunday morning I made carnitas in the crockpot for dinner, and to eat throughout the week. It’s one of my favorite meat dishes because not only is it very versatile, it’s really easy. Sunday was day day 28 on my Whole 30, and I wanted something fresh and flavorful, but light. I’ve made them before with this same recipe and I really enjoy the flavor.

Crockpot Carnitas

  • Pork shoulder/pork butt (about 5-6lbs)
  • 1 orange
  • 1 yellow onion, loosely chopped
  • 1/2 cup coconut aminos (soy sauce substitute)
  • Minced garlic (maybe 2 TBSP, I love garlic)
  • 3 bay leaves
  • Salt/pepper
  • Cumin
  • Smoked paprika
  • Crushed red pepper
  • 2 cups Chicken broth

The meat I used this time was a combination 1/2 and 1/2 pork shoulder/pork butt wrapped together in netting (the butt was pretty fatty, YUM). I left the netting intact for cooking and generously coated the meat in salt and pepper, then sprinkled with the remaining spices: cumin, smoked paprika and crushed red pepper. Place the meat in the crockpot and squeeze the juice of 1/2 the orange over the top of the meat, then add all remaining ingredients. I set it on high for about 2 hours until it was boiling and then turned it down to low for a couple hours. I then flipped it and brought it back up to a boil on the other side, then turned it back down to low for another hour or so. Total time was about 6-7hrs. Then I cut the netting off and shredded the meat for dinner. We made carnitas bowls with all of our favorite fixings (cilantro, lime wedges, avocado, tomato, raw red onion, sliced green olive, hot sauce, salsa, cabbage, etc.).

All of the fresh flavor of carnitas, without the glycemic load of tortillas!

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Sesame Vegetable Stir-Fry

I’m doing the Whole 30 for the first time. It’s something I’ve been thinking and reading about for a long time, just never committed to. Fast forward years, when modern medicine has failed to help me with an ongoing-what-seems-to-be-another-chronic-issue, you just can’t help but think, it has to be something within my environment that is triggering these things. 30+ medications and treatments and not a single budge in improvement, when those treatments typically help 95% of the population? Well, I mean, I know I historically reside in the 5%, but for fucks sake! Anyway, more on that later.

Needless to say, I’ve been cooking up a storm and getting creative in the kitchen! Fortunately I consider myself pretty savvy in the kitchen and love food, so I don’t feel stress or obligation to follow specific recipes while completing this Whole 30. I probably will make some recipes, but it just isn’t my style. I’d rather create random things using quality ingredients. I had plenty of leftover protein to reheat from cooking throughout the week, so I needed a side to go with it last night, and I was craving some different flavors, Asian sounded tasty. What I ended up with had the perfect balance of sweet, spicy and nutty.

Asian Inspired Stir-Fry

  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, diced
  • 1 orange bell pepper, diced
  • 1 white onion, diced
  • 1 cup finely chopped brussels sprouts
  • 2 TBSP minced garlic
  • 2 TBSP coconut oil
  • 2 tsp dried ginger
  • Himalayan pink salt
  • Black pepper
  • Chili flakes
  • 1/4 cup coconut aminos
  • Sesame oil
  • Sesame seeds

Put all veggies, garlic, coconut oil, dried ginger, and sprinkle of salt and pepper in saute pan on med-high heat, sauteing until coconut oil is mostly absorbed and onions are starting to turn transparent. Decrease heat to low-med and sprinkle chili flakes (personal preference for spice, but I used probably 2 tsp) and add coconut aminos (soy sauce substitute), continuing to saute until everything is cooked but not mushy, maybe 3 minutes more. Reduced to low heat and drizzle sesame oil over vegetables and toss. However you decide to plate this side, garnish with sesame seeds. If you think you’ll have leftovers, I’d garnish with seeds only on specific plates/bowls so the seeds don’t get mushy in the leftover portion to be reheated. Side note – I toss the sesame oil in recipes last, because it has a low smoke point and oxidizes when heated on high heat.¬†Perfect blend of nutty, sweet, spicy flavor!

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